A three-time winner at the Grade 1 level (Los Alamitos Futurity at 2, the Pennsylvania Derby and Malibu Stakes at 3), McKinzie added a fourth G1 to his record with a smart-looking victory in the Aug. 3 Whitney Stakes at Saratoga.

As a highly regarded member of his crop at 2 and 3, McKinzie was generally considered a very good thing as prospective divisional champion this season, but the handsome dark bay son of Kentucky Derby winner Street Sense (by Street Cry) ran second in the G1 Santa Anita Handicap, won his first stakes of the season at Churchill Downs in the G2 Alysheba Stakes, and then ran second on merits against Mitole in the G1 Metropolitan.

With another much desired G1 victory, McKinzie is now looking more and more like the powerful divisional presence he was expected to be, as well as an increasingly desirable stallion prospect.

As an unbeaten juvenile and a two-time G1 winner at 3, now adding a fourth G1 at 4 with $2.2 million in earnings from seven victories in 12 starts, McKinzie clearly has the athletic credentials to make a stallion. As a handsome and charismatic animal, he is appealing as a physical specimen, and costing $170,000 at the 2016 Keeneland September sale, he brought the sixth-highest price for a Street Sense yearling among 47 sold that year.

So the commercial market gives him a thumbs up.

And despite what anyone might think about the commercial market endorsement, it is essential for a young stallion who might become “big time.” For a stallion like American Pharoah, for instance, the dictates of sales might have somewhat less effect because there is considerable cachet just to having a ‘pharoah.’

For nearly every other young stallion entering the profession, however, being on the positive side of the equation with commercial breeders means the young horse gets the most appealing mares, the fullest books, the best receipts at sales, and typically the most desirable stock goes to the more successful buyers, trainers, owners, and jockeys.

With only one stallion in 10, at best, making a success, every single advantage counts.

And with all the excellent qualities that McKinzie possesses, he will get a major shot at sire success when he goes to stud.

Bred in Kentucky by Summer Wind Farm, McKinzie is out of three generations of stakes-winning mares. The dark bay colt’s dam is Runway Model (Petionville), winner of the G2 Alcibiades Stakes, second in the G1 Ashland, and third in the G1 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies. Runway Model was a very high-class racer, and her son is cut from the same cloth.

In pedigree, McKinzie is linebred to the mighty Mr. Prospector (Raise a Native) through Petionville’s sire Seeking the Gold and through Street Cry’s sire Machiavellian. Seeking the Gold and Machiavellian were high-class racers who became eminent sires in international racing. In addition to siring champions in the States, Seeking the Gold is best known as the sire of the once-beaten Dubai Millennium, a horse of exceptional ability who tragically was struck down part-way through his first and only season at stud. Yet Dubai Millennium’s branch of Mr. Prospector has a first-rate sire in Dubawi, whose son Too Darn Hot won the G1 Sussex Stakes at Goodwood on July 31.

Less renowned than Dubai Millennium, Petionville proved a good sire, and Runway Model was one of his best. Likewise, Street Cry and Street Sense represent the best qualities in their line of descent from Mr. Prospector and Machiavellian.

A highly talented juvenile who ran second in the Del Mar Futurity and third in the BC Juvenile, Street Cry won the UAE 2,000 Guineas at 3 but then missed nearly all of his second season. Returning at 4, Street Cry won his first three starts at 4: the G2 Maktoum Challenge, the G1 Dubai World Cup, and the G1 Stephen Foster before finishing second in the G1 Whitney of 2002 and being retired to stud.

Standing for Darley at their Jonabell facility in Lexington, the massively proportioned Street Cry became an immediate success. His first crop included Street Sense, winner of G1 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile and the Eclipse Award as top juvenile colt. Street Sense proceeded to win the 2007 Kentucky Derby and Travers, finishing second to Curlin in the Preakness. In the slop at Monmouth, Curlin won the BC Classic, with Street Sense fourth, and that success brought the chestnut son of Smart Strike (Mr. Prospector) both the divisional title and Horse of the Year. The month after Street Sense ended his career on the track, a filly from their sire’s first crop won her debut at Hollywood Park; 19 victories and three years later, Zenyatta was a legend. Her storied successes kept her sire in the limelight, and this cast benefits and glory on Street Cry’s sons like champion Steet Sense.

Street Sense has been popular and successful at stud, with McKinzie, Sweet Reason (G1 Acorn, Test, and Spinaway), Wedding Toast (G1 Ogden Phipps and Beldame), Aubby K (G1 Distaff), Callback (G1 Las Virgenes), and Street Fancy (G1 Hollywood Starlet) being his top-tier winners in the States, plus Sense of Occasion (G1 Doomben Cup), Hallowed Crown (G1 Golden Rose and Randwick Guineas), Politeness (G1 Myer Classic), and Dixie Blossoms (G1 Tad Kennedy Stakes) in Australia.

Street Sense stands for a 2019 stud fee of $50,000 at Darley’s operation in Kentucky, and the horse ranks 9th on the leading sire list for 2019.

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