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The following piece appeared earlier this week at Paulick Report.

Good horses overcome amazing odds and circumstances to win. We have only to look at the efforts that Zenyatta has produced time and again to remain unbeaten in 19 consecutive races.

Other times, horses seem to overcome those kinds of hurdles just to become competitors. In the case of Jaycito, the 2-year-old colt who won the Norfolk Stakes at Oak Tree on the same card as Zenyatta’s victory in the Lady’s Secret, the bay colt became a Grade 1 winner with his first victory from three starts (and two seconds).

Furthermore, the colt is by champion Victory Gallop, now exiled to stand in Turkey, and is the only living foal of his dam, the 12-year-old Ascot Knight mare Night Edition.

The best racing son of the Fappiano horse Cryptoclearance, Victory Gallop was a champion at 4, earned $3 million on the racetrack, and won the Belmont Stakes by slightly more than a nose hair from Real Quiet.

The combination of high class and good looks sent Victory Gallop to stud in Kentucky at Prestonwood Farm (now WinStar), and the bay horse remained there until he was sold to the Turkish Jockey Club and was exported to stand at one of their national studs.

The sale was a mild surprise because Victory Gallop was not a poor stallion. He has sired 7% stakes winners from foals, and some of them, like Jaycito, have had quite a lot of class.

Victory Gallop, however, did tend to sire stock rather like the Cryptoclearances in general look and build: good-sized, racy athletes but generally without the body mass and early muscular development so prized among buyers who pay big money for yearlings at the sales.

So when representatives for the Jockey Club of Turkey came calling, their offer found favor, and on Feb. 11, 2008, Victory Gallop shipped out of Kentucky to his new home half-way around the world.

The stallion now stands at Karacabey Pension Stud near Izmit, Turkey, for a private fee.

The foals born in 2008 are Victory Gallop’s last U.S. crop, and Jaycito is the leader of the pack. In all, breeders sent 87 mares to the stallion in 2007, and 52 live foals were recorded for Jaycito’s crop.

Bred in Kentucky by Runnymede Farm and Catesby Clay, Jaycito just barely made it under the wire before his sire was sent abroad, but the colt really bucked the odds in being born.

His dam, the tough gray mare Night Edition, raced 32 times in four seasons, winning $274,013, but Night Edition has not had any good luck as a broodmare. From six years’ breeding, the mare has produced only two live foals, Jaycito and a daughter of Mutakddim who raced once, won, and died.

The good-looking mare’s ill fortune as a producer is all the more sad because she had some ability at the racetrack, winning three times and finishing third in the Algoma, Classy ‘n Smart, and Victoriana stakes as a 4-year-old.

As a part of the piercing irony of the breeding business, Night Edition also obviously possesses many of the right qualities that any breeder looks for in a broodmare. Both her foals are winners, and the mare’s surviving racer, Jaycito, graduated to become a G1 winner over the weekend.

That result was not a longshot, as Jaycito had shown his class with a good second in the Del Mar Futurity behind J P’s Gusto, and Jaycito’s improving form allowed him to defeat his favored opponent on Saturday.

Despite their difficulties with Night Edition, breeder Runnymede Farm chose the mare for the right reasons when they paid $62,000 for her when barren to the Canadian-based stallion Tethra at the 2004 Keeneland November sale.

The mare is good looking and gets athletic and attractive foals.

Night Edition’s Mutakddim filly, Meli, brought $50,000 as a yearling, the second-highest price for her sire, and Jaycito sold for $110,000 last year at the September sale as one of the last-crop offerings by Victory Gallop.

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